Damn, Alex Tabuns!

Damn, Alex Tabuns!

(Source: alex-tabuns)

Box explores the synthesis of real and digital space through projection-mapping onto moving surfaces. The short film documents a live performance, captured entirely in camera. botndolly.com/box

CREDITS
Production Company: BOT & DOLLY
Executive Producers: Bill Galusha, Nick Read
Creative & Technical Director: Tarik Abdel-Gawad
Design Director: Bradley G Munkowitz
Lead Graphic Designers: Bradley G Munkowitz, Jason English Kerr
3D Artists: Scott Pagano, Bradley G Munkowitz, Jason English Kerr, Conor Grebel
2D Animators: Conor Grebel, Ben Hawkins, Pedro Figueira
Director of Photography: Joe Picard
Lighting Designers: Joe Picard, Phil Reyneri
Projection / TouchDesigner: Phil Reyneri
Robotics Animation: Tarik Abdel-Gawad, Brandon Kruysman, George Banks, Michael Beardsworth
Robotics Operator: Michael Beardsworth, Brandon Kruysman
Prop Fabrication: Matt Bitterman, Ethan Dale
Script Supervisor: Ian Colon
Sound Engineers: Joe Picard, Michael Beardsworth
PAs: Sean Servis, Dakota Smith, Nico Mizono, Eric Wendel, Patrick Walsh
Editors: Ashley Rodholm, Ian Colon
Music / Sound Design: Keith Ruggiero
Sound Mix: Joel Raabe
Performers: Tarik Abdel-Gawad, Iris, Scout

rebeccamock:

A Year In Trees
A made this animated/print piece to accompany the beautiful op-ed story “A Year in Trees" for the NY Times. I was really excited to try animating something like this. Thanks AD’s Erich Nagler and Aviva Michaelov !

rebeccamock:

A Year In Trees

A made this animated/print piece to accompany the beautiful op-ed story “A Year in Trees" for the NY Times. I was really excited to try animating something like this. Thanks AD’s Erich Nagler and Aviva Michaelov !

source: http://hanekawatsubasa.tumblr.com

source: http://hanekawatsubasa.tumblr.com

(Source: banjirou, via charcoalfeathers)

The significance of plot without conflict

stilleatingoranges:

In the West, plot is commonly thought to revolve around conflict: a confrontation between two or more elements, in which one ultimately dominates the other. The standard three- and five-act plot structures—which permeate Western media—have conflict written into their very foundations. A “problem” appears near the end of the first act; and, in the second act, the conflict generated by this problem takes center stage. Conflict is used to create reader involvement even by many post-modern writers, whose work otherwise defies traditional structure.

The necessity of conflict is preached as a kind of dogma by contemporary writers’ workshops and Internet “guides” to writing. A plot without conflict is considered dull; some even go so far as to call it impossible. This has influenced not only fiction, but writing in general—arguably even philosophy. Yet, is there any truth to this belief? Does plot necessarily hinge on conflict? No. Such claims are a product of the West’s insularity. For countless centuries, Chinese and Japanese writers have used a plot structure that does not have conflict “built in”, so to speak. Rather, it relies on exposition and contrast to generate interest. This structure is known as kishōtenketsu.

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Lilli Carré: eyeworks

drawnblog:

lillicarre:

image

I didn’t know cartoonist and illustrator Lilli Carré had a tumblr of just animations, but now I do, and so do you. Holy mackerel! I’m in the middle of finishing her new book Heads or Tails, after which I’ll write a review. Spoiler alert: it’s fantastic. 

(link via Maré Odomo’s on Twitter)

WOW

my new favorite pic of obama

my new favorite pic of obama

(Source: alexleo)

NIGHTNIGHT by DEDDY